these large fossil teeth might have belonged dinosaur

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these large fossil teeth might have belonged dinosaur

However, from the perspective of this particular story, Realistic Animatronic Dinosaur the really important discoveries were not made until around 1821-2 and at the same quarries, around Whiteman’s Green in Cuckfield, visited by William Smith some 13 years earlier. At this time, an energetic and ambitious medical doctor, Gideon Algernon Mantell (1790-1852), living in the town of Lewes, was dedicating all his spare time to completing a detailed report on the geological structure and fossils in his native Weald district (an area incorporating much of Surrey, Sussex, and part of Kent) in southern England. His work culminated in an impressively large, well-illustrated book that he published in 1822. Included in this book were clear descriptions of several unusual, large reptilian teeth and ribs that he had been unable to identify properly. Several of these teeth were purchased by Mantell from quarrymen, life-like animatronic dinosaur for sale while others had been collected by his wife, Mary Ann. The next three years saw Mantell struggling to identify the type of animal to which these large fossil teeth might have belonged. Although not trained in comparative anatomy (the particular specialism of Cuvier), he developed contacts with many learned men in England in the hope of gaining some insight into the affinity of his fossils; he also sent some of his precious specimens to Cuvier in Paris for identification. At first, Dinosaur Costume Mantell’s discoveries were dismissed, even by Cuvier, as fragments of Recent animals (perhaps the incisor teeth of a rhinoceros, or those of large, coral-chewing, bony fish). Undeterred, Mantell continued to investigate his problem, and finally found a likely solution. In the collections of the Royal College of Surgeons in London he was shown the skeleton of an iguana, a herbivorous lizard that had recently been discovered in South America. The teeth were similar in general shape to those of his fossils a.nd indicated to Mantell that they belonged to an extinct, herbivorous, giant relative of the living iguana. Mantell published a report on the new discovery in 1825 and the name chosen for this fossil creature was, perhaps not surprisingly, Iguanodon. The name means, quite literally, ‘iguana tooth’ and was created yet again, at the suggestion of Conybeare (clearly the latter’s classical training and turn of mind gave him a natural facility in the naming of many of these early discoveries).