Iguanodon was no lumbering

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Iguanodon was no lumbering

The influence of the debate raging in England cannot be doubted. Animatronic dinosaur This new discovery pointed to the truth implicit in Huxley’s arguments and made it clear that Mantell had been on the right track in 1851. Iguanodon was no lumbering, scaly rhinoceros lookalike as portrayed by Owen in his grand models of 1854; rather it was a huge creature with a pose similar to that of a resting kangaroo, but with a number of bird-like attributes, just as Huxley’s theory predicted.

 

Dollo proved to be tirelessly inventive in his approach to the fossil creatures that he described – he dissected crocodiles and birds in order to better understand the biology and detailed musculature of these animals and how it could be used to identify the soft tissues of his dinosaurs. Animatronic dinosaur for sale In many respects, he was adopting a decidedly forensic approach to understanding those mysterious fossils. Dollo was regarded as the architect of a new style of palaeontology that became known as palaeobiology. Dollo demonstrated that palaeontology should be expanded to investigate the biology, and by implication ecology and behaviour, of these extinct creatures. His final contribution to the Iguanodon story was a paper he published in 1923 to honour the centenary of Mantell’s original discoveries. He succinctly summarized his views on the dinosaur, Dinosaur costume identifying it as the dinosaurian ecological equivalent of the giraffe (or indeed Mantell’s giant ground sloth). Dollo concluded that its posture enabled it to reach high into trees to gather its fodder, which it was able to draw into its mouth by using a long, muscular tongue; the sharp beak was used to nip off tough stems, while the characteristic teeth served to pulp the food before it was swallowed. So firmly was this authoritative interpretation adopted, based as it was on a set of complete articulated skeletons, that it stood, literally and metaphorically, unchallenged for the next 60 years. This was reinforced by the distribution of replica, mounted skeletons of Iguanodon from Brussels to many of the great museums around the world during the early years of the 20th century, and also by the many popular and influential textbooks written on the subject.